Off to a busy new year!

sawkillwatershedcommunityfebruarymeeting2

Bard student, Isaac Yelchin, describes the “Big Night” to a full audience at our February community meeting.

After a month off, we are back and busy this February!

On February 10th we had our first water quality monitoring day of 2017! A HUGE thank you to all of the volunteers who battled the snowy weather to gather samples, and the volunteers who dedicated their Friday afternoon to process the samples. We are very excited to see how the winter month results compare to our other data.

On the 15th we had our first community meeting of the year at the Elmendorf Inn in Red Hook. There was a great turn out, and it was wonderful to see both old and new faces! We had a presentation on the assessment of doing a micro-hydro power project on the Saw Kill as we have historic dams on the Saw Kill that are currently unused for hydropower. This project is looking at the feasibility of micro hydro or dam removal–it does not take for granted that micro-hydro will be built, but does an honest assessment of what hydro power would look like at Bard’s dam.

Take a look at our meeting minutes (link) to see more information on Micro-hydro, and the current state of the assessment.

Our community conversation focused on how our local watershed can relate to our larger Hudson River watershed, as well as other communities both regionally and nationally. Looking forward to talking more about this in future conversations. Furthering community engagement and expanding our community was a large theme voiced in our community brainstorming, as well as thinking about how to improve our water monitoring program.

Coming up we have a film screening, Hudson River Environmental Futures: Film Screening & Discussion. A short film in the Hudson River: A River at Risk series by Jon Bowermaster. Riverkeeper staff and others will lead discussion at Bard College (Campus Center/Weis Cinema) on March 7, 2017 at 4:45 PM.  

Also in March, will be the Big Night! When the temperature gets just right, different amphibians come out of hibernation and head to their vernal pools. Volunteers are needed to help the salamanders cross the road safely and count. Contact us if you are interested in this important citizen science opportunity. Lastly, March will also bring our monthly monitoring program and next community meeting.

It has been a busy month already, and we look forward to only getting busier! Hope to see you out in the watershed!

 

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