A recap of our November Community Meeting

November’s community meeting focused on flooding- mitigation strategies and our watershed’s role. Carolyn Klocker and Karen Schneller-McDonald started off the evening by discussing flooding and our watersheds. Flooding is a normal part of stream function, however the intensity and frequency of flood events has increased with changes in climate and land use. As communitys look to respond to increased flooding, their watershed can play an important role in natural flood protection. Protecting our wetlands and buffers were examples of preventative measures that can be more cost effective than remediation or elaborate infrastructure. You can view Karen’s presentation here.

Beth Roessler from the NYS Dec Hudson River Estuary Program presented on stream buffers and flood protection. She defined the different terms used in talking about buffers, terms which can often be confused.  The riparian area being the interface between land and waterbody. This area is unique with different soils and the wildlife it supports. A riparian buffer is the vegetated protective area between a waterbody and human activity. And the flood plain is the area which can be expected to flood (either frequently or in 100 year events). A healthy buffer filters pollutants and nutrients, provides temperature control, recharges groundwater, controls flooding and erosion, and provides habitat.  It should be wide, at least 100 feet is a good rule of thumb, have many types and sizes of resilient plants, provide shade and leaf litter. An unhealthy buffer is paved or built up, manicured lawn, hardened or eroded banks, and full of invasives. When looking to restore a buffer area, targeted areas should protect floodplains, headwater streams and wetlands. They should reduce the amount of stormwater runoff and be restored smartly with plants that can handle conditions like sediment build up. There are tools for the local to state scale, but one highlighted state-wide program is Trees for Tribs. The SKWC has worked with Trees for Tribs in the past on different properties in the watershed. The program provides native trees and shrubs, plant protection, recommendations, education and planting demonstrations. For more information on the program, see here, and if you have a potential site in the watershed you would like to see restored, let us know!

The last presentation was from Red Hook CAC member, Jen Cavanaugh. She gave an update on the Flood Mitigation Assessment Project. A team of engineers, watershed scientists, flood managers, and community members have been working to assess the history of flooding in the area and possible solutions for in the future. After being out in the field and getting local input, geomorphic assessments, hydrologic/hydraulic assessments, and researching flood mitigation strategies and management methods, they are finalizing their report and presenting to stakeholders in public meetings. Their work found problem areas along the Saw Kill (mostly in the lower reaches), and identified possible solutions. We encourage you to come out to their public meetings to learn more.

To read the full meeting minutes, take a look here. We are excited to continue our work even as the days get chillier. Our next water quality monitoring day is Friday, Dec. 8th. If you are interested in volunteering, please contact Tierney at tw4287@bard.edu. Our next community meeting, and last of the 2017 year, will be on Wednesday, Dec. 13th at the Elmendorph Inn. Hope to see you out in the watershed soon!

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