Bard freshman get introduced to the Saw Kill

The Saw Kill runs through the communities of Milan, Red Hook, Rhinebeck and Annandale-on-Hudson. It empties in to the South Tivoli Bays after a meandering last stretch through Bard College’s campus. For many students, the Saw Kill means the waterfall, or the student run cafe. Lesser known, is that the Saw Kill is where the college takes in its drinking water, and further downstream is where their treated waste water is released. Bard’s use of the Saw Kill and close presence make the institution an important stakeholder in the watershed.

Last week, 400 plus freshman arrived on campus for orientation. As part of their orientation, we wanted students to learn more about the watershed and community they are now calling home. We tabled at events and talked to students about their drinking water, what a watershed means, and how they can get engaged in their community.

This past Sunday, we took a group of freshman on a hike a long the Saw Kill. With Sarah Mount from the DEC, Bard science faculty, and Bard upperclassmen, we talked about the Saw Kill, the ecology of the area, the Bard experience, and the larger Hudson River watershed we are connected to. At the mouth of the Saw Kill we donned waders to kick net for benthic macroinvertebrates and seine for fish. We were lucky enough to find some cool critters like the Dobson Fly Larvae and Dragonfly larvae, some Killifish, along with our favourite american eel in its elver stage.

Students were excited to be out in the Saw Kill, and interested in furthering their engagement with the Saw Kill and their new community. We are so happy to welcome the Bard class of 2021 to the watershed!

 

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Community walk along the Saw Kill

Last week we had an awesome walk along the portion of the Saw Kill that runs through Bard campus with ecologist Gretchen Stevens from Hudsonia. It was a beautiful summer night, and a great opportunity to catch up with old friends, and meet some new faces. It was wonderful to see families, students, folks from different Hudson Valley environmental groups, and community members from Red Hook and Milan all out together.

saw kill watershed community july monthly meeting 1

Our conversation, as we stopped at different points along the Saw Kill, focused on the ecology of the river and the much discussed micro-hydro project. Gretchen confirmed what we all know to be true, that our Saw Kill is a unique and special environment. It happens to be home to unique bird species such as the migrating Louisiana Waterthrush, and the Winter Wren. We also looked at rare plant species like the American Spikenard. We talked about the trout species, such as brown trout, that make their home in the Saw Kill. This ties into recent conversations on stream classification as the Saw Kill is designated class T for trout, as well as class B. And my favorite Hudson Estuary fish, the American Eel, got a special mention as we took a look at the eel bucket/ladder system on one of the existing dams.

saw kill watershed community july monthly meeting 2

Many questions on the feasibility of a micro-hydro project, and consequences of such a project or dam removal were discussed. A group, that presented to the SKWC in February, has been putting together information on the possibility of micro hydro on one of the old dams along the Saw Kill. For the minutes of that meeting see here. This is an ongoing community conversation that is addressing questions surrounding habitat, migration, eel accessibility, sediment loading, flow, etc. in order to understand the effects of such a project.

saw kill watershed community july monthly meeting 3

Along with all of the information gained, it was a wonderful opportunity to not just talk about the Saw Kill but experience the Saw Kill as a community.

We look forward to seeing everyone again at our next meeting, Wednesday, August 16th.

Taking our community meeting to the Saw Kill

We hope everyone is enjoying the summer months and getting plenty of time to explore the watershed. The weather is too nice to ignore, so we are taking our monthly community meeting outside and to the Saw Kill!

saw kill watershed community skwc water sampling

Please join us this Wednesday, July 19th from 6:30-7:30pm. We will be walking along the portion of Saw Kill Creek that runs through Bard campus with Hudsonia naturalist Gretchen Stevens. This is an exciting opportunity to learn more about the ecology of the Saw Kill, take a look at one of the dams, and spend some time together outdoors as a community. Families are welcome!

If you would like more information, please email Tierney (SKWC intern) at tw4287@bard.edu.

Looking forward to seeing you there!

Rose Hill Farm Tree Planting

A huge thank you to all of the wonderful volunteers that came out Halloween weekend to plant trees with us!!! We planted 120 trees in a little over an hour! ¬†Another thank you to Scenic Hudson and Tree’s for Tribs for facilitating such a wonderful event and doing the amazing work you do! And lastly, an enormous thank you to Rose Hill Farm for their support and enthusiasm for the project, as well as the yummy cider and cider doughnuts!

 

 

The trees were planted alongside a tributary of the Saw Kill. Tree plantings along waterways are super important for establishing riparian zones, which can help prevent erosion and excess nutrients or pollutants getting in to the water. This tributary will eventually flow in to the Saw Kill, so by protecting inputs here we help protect the larger watershed.

Another big thank you to everyone for a great event!!!!