Check out our data on Riverkeeper’s site

Every month, SKWC citizen scientists go out and collect samples from 14 different locations along the Saw Kill. They record observations and data such as temperature and salinity. The samples are then taken to the Bard Water Lab, where they are processed for parameters such as sewage indicating bacteria, nutrients, and turbidity.

But what happens to that data? We present lots of our findings at our monthly community meetings. And now, thanks to Riverkeeper, you can view our findings on Enterococcus counts online. Their interactive map shows our sampling locations, and data alongside environmental conditions such as rain events.

saw kill riverkeeper map

Entero what? Enterococcus is a bacteria found in the intestines of humans and other warm blooded animals. It’s called “fecal indicating” because of its presence in human sewage. Therefore, an abundance of enterococcus in the water can correlate with sewage contamination. The EPA uses enterococcus counts to regulate water safety. Riverkeeper shows these counts alongside rainfall data as rain events often trigger fecal contamination. Looking at the two side by side helps us understand whether enterococcus levels are weather related or due to other factors.

Take a look around the site! They have lots of interesting information on water quality, as well as data on surrounding watersheds. The map reminds us of our watershed’s connection to surrounding watersheds and communities. It’s exciting to see our separate data collections coming together to create a larger, more complex picture.

 

 

Check out SKWC member’s recent article on water quality!

eli figure 4
Figure taken from Eli’s paper. This figure shows the microbial exchange among sediment, water and air.

Eli Dueker, SKWC member and Bard professor, recently published a paper on Challenges to Managing Microbial Fecal Pollution in CoastaEnvironments: Extra-Enteric Ecology and Microbial Exchange Among Water, Sediment, and Air.” . The paper adds complexity to traditional understanding of fecal indicator bacteria.   His research looks at fecal indicator bacteria, some of the same ones we monitor in our sampling program, and their interactions with both air and sediment as well as water. Improved water quality management would recognize the importance of these microbial exchanges, as well as microbial particle association and microbes length of environmental persistence.

We are excited to see such interesting research being done by a member of our community, as well as applicable to our ongoing efforts to improve our own sampling program.