Upcoming panel on protecting our drinking water

Protecting Drinking Water in the Saw Kill Watershed: A Regulatory and Policy Perspective

Monday, September 25, 2017, 6:00 pm-8:30 pm

Red Hook Community Center, 59 Fisk St., Red Hook

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Join us for a community meeting and discussion with a panel of experts to learn more about the Saw Kill Watershed as a drinking water source. Topics include:

  • Why it’s important to protect water supplies throughout the watershed.
  • How the community can respond to water supply contamination.
  • How to use laws, policies, tools, and other resources available for protecting drinking water.

Bring your questions, concerns, and ideas! We will have plenty of time for discussion and responses to questions.

Refreshments will be provided.

This meeting is a Hudson River Regional Council event in collaboration with the Saw Kill Watershed Community.

This event is free, but registration is required. To register, please go to http://bit.ly/2gHVFzR.

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Community Meeting on Wednesday, August 23rd

Please join us for our next community meeting on Wednesday, August 23, from 7 to 8:30 p.m. at the historic Elmendorph Inn in Red Hook.

We’ll have two really valuable presentations at this meeting. Karen Schneller McDonald and Carolyn Klocker will be talking about connecting your drinking water to the watershed. How does the watershed affect the water from your well or the local water system? And how does what you do about your drinking water affect the watershed?

They’ll be followed by Brent Kovalchik, Deputy Mayor, Village of Red Hook, who will give us an update and take comments and questions on Phase 1 of the village sewer project.

We’ll wrap up the evening with community comments and questions.

For our September community meeting, we’ll be participating in a workshop, Protecting Drinking Water in the Saw Kill Watershed: A Regulatory and Policy Perspective, in conjunction with the Hudson Valley Regional Council (HVRC). This free event will be held on Monday, September 25, from 6 to 8:30 p.m. at the Red Hook Community Center (59 Fisk Street).

We look forward to seeing you there!

Community walk along the Saw Kill

Last week we had an awesome walk along the portion of the Saw Kill that runs through Bard campus with ecologist Gretchen Stevens from Hudsonia. It was a beautiful summer night, and a great opportunity to catch up with old friends, and meet some new faces. It was wonderful to see families, students, folks from different Hudson Valley environmental groups, and community members from Red Hook and Milan all out together.

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Our conversation, as we stopped at different points along the Saw Kill, focused on the ecology of the river and the much discussed micro-hydro project. Gretchen confirmed what we all know to be true, that our Saw Kill is a unique and special environment. It happens to be home to unique bird species such as the migrating Louisiana Waterthrush, and the Winter Wren. We also looked at rare plant species like the American Spikenard. We talked about the trout species, such as brown trout, that make their home in the Saw Kill. This ties into recent conversations on stream classification as the Saw Kill is designated class T for trout, as well as class B. And my favorite Hudson Estuary fish, the American Eel, got a special mention as we took a look at the eel bucket/ladder system on one of the existing dams.

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Many questions on the feasibility of a micro-hydro project, and consequences of such a project or dam removal were discussed. A group, that presented to the SKWC in February, has been putting together information on the possibility of micro hydro on one of the old dams along the Saw Kill. For the minutes of that meeting see here. This is an ongoing community conversation that is addressing questions surrounding habitat, migration, eel accessibility, sediment loading, flow, etc. in order to understand the effects of such a project.

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Along with all of the information gained, it was a wonderful opportunity to not just talk about the Saw Kill but experience the Saw Kill as a community.

We look forward to seeing everyone again at our next meeting, Wednesday, August 16th.

Taking our community meeting to the Saw Kill

We hope everyone is enjoying the summer months and getting plenty of time to explore the watershed. The weather is too nice to ignore, so we are taking our monthly community meeting outside and to the Saw Kill!

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Please join us this Wednesday, July 19th from 6:30-7:30pm. We will be walking along the portion of Saw Kill Creek that runs through Bard campus with Hudsonia naturalist Gretchen Stevens. This is an exciting opportunity to learn more about the ecology of the Saw Kill, take a look at one of the dams, and spend some time together outdoors as a community. Families are welcome!

If you would like more information, please email Tierney (SKWC intern) at tw4287@bard.edu.

Looking forward to seeing you there!

Off to a busy new year!

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Bard student, Isaac Yelchin, describes the “Big Night” to a full audience at our February community meeting.

After a month off, we are back and busy this February!

On February 10th we had our first water quality monitoring day of 2017! A HUGE thank you to all of the volunteers who battled the snowy weather to gather samples, and the volunteers who dedicated their Friday afternoon to process the samples. We are very excited to see how the winter month results compare to our other data.

On the 15th we had our first community meeting of the year at the Elmendorf Inn in Red Hook. There was a great turn out, and it was wonderful to see both old and new faces! We had a presentation on the assessment of doing a micro-hydro power project on the Saw Kill as we have historic dams on the Saw Kill that are currently unused for hydropower. This project is looking at the feasibility of micro hydro or dam removal–it does not take for granted that micro-hydro will be built, but does an honest assessment of what hydro power would look like at Bard’s dam.

Take a look at our meeting minutes (link) to see more information on Micro-hydro, and the current state of the assessment.

Our community conversation focused on how our local watershed can relate to our larger Hudson River watershed, as well as other communities both regionally and nationally. Looking forward to talking more about this in future conversations. Furthering community engagement and expanding our community was a large theme voiced in our community brainstorming, as well as thinking about how to improve our water monitoring program.

Coming up we have a film screening, Hudson River Environmental Futures: Film Screening & Discussion. A short film in the Hudson River: A River at Risk series by Jon Bowermaster. Riverkeeper staff and others will lead discussion at Bard College (Campus Center/Weis Cinema) on March 7, 2017 at 4:45 PM.  

Also in March, will be the Big Night! When the temperature gets just right, different amphibians come out of hibernation and head to their vernal pools. Volunteers are needed to help the salamanders cross the road safely and count. Contact us if you are interested in this important citizen science opportunity. Lastly, March will also bring our monthly monitoring program and next community meeting.

It has been a busy month already, and we look forward to only getting busier! Hope to see you out in the watershed!